SKU: 3006-10RD Condition: New Availability: Usually Ships Within 24 Hours Shipping: Calculated at Checkout

Below are the available bulk discount rates for each individual item when you purchase a certain amount

Buy 2 - 2 and get 3% off Buy 3 or above and get 4% off

Product Description

10 Round Magazine - Remington 740, 742, 750, 760

First introduced in 1955 as the Model 740A, in 1960 it was changed to model 742 and introduced in many calibers, including .30-06, .243, .308 and .280 REM. Made in various deluxe and presentation grades. We manufacture an oversize 10-shot magazine for the calibers listed. The magazine will not hold the slide open on the last round for the 7600 series rifle. Fits new model 750 but will not hold slide back on last round.

You are watching: 742 remington 30-06 magazine

Features

Action Type:Semi-Auto

Capacity:10-Round

Finish:Black

Material:Steel

Fit:Remington 740, 742, 7400, 750, 760, 7600 Rifles

*

Remington Magazine Description

Fits the following models:

*The 7600 series rifle and the new 750 rifle, will not hold the bolt open on the last round.

SALE: limited time only. We here at Gun Show Mags, provide what is called a 10-shot oversized magazine for the following calibers .30-06, 270, 280.

The Remington Model 742,

also known as the Woodsmaster is a semi-automatic rifle that was produced by Remington Arms from 1960 until 1980. It uses a straight 4 round magazine, a 10-round magazine, and a rare 20 round magazine. Features include a side ejection port and a free-floating barrel.

The Remington Model 700 is a series of bolt-actioncenterfirerifles manufactured by Remington Arms since 1962. It is a development of the Remington 721 and 722 series of rifles, which were introduced in 1948. The M24 and M40 military sniper rifles, used by the US Army and USMC, respectively, are both based on the Model 700 design.

The Remington 700 series rifles often come with a 3-, 4- or 5-round internal magazine depending on the caliber chambered, some of which have a hinged floor-plate for quick unloading, and some of which are "blind" (with no floor-plate). The rifle can also be ordered with a detachable box magazine. The Model 700 is available in many different stock, barrel and caliber configurations, with many third-party and aftermarket variants in the market built on the same action footprint. From 1978 to 1982 Remington offered the Sportsman 78 which is the same model 700 action but with cheaper features such as a plain stock without checkering. The Sportsman 78 was not included in the recall that affected the trigger group.

Remington 750 Magazine 10 rds

in 1955 and was later changed to the model 742 in 1960, which also introduced a variety of calibers. Those calibers being .30-06, .308, .243 and .280 REM. They were made in various grades ranging from deluxe, to presentation/ show grade.

30-06 high capacity magazine

Remington 742 magazine

Also known as the Woodsmaster is a semi-automatic rifle that was produced by Remington Arms from 1960 until 1980. It uses a straight 4 round magazine, a 10-round magazine, and a rare 20 round magazine. Features include a side ejection port and a free-floating barrel.

PerformanceThe .30-06 cartridge was designed when shots of 1,000 yards (914.4 m) were expected. In 1906, the original M1906 .30-06 cartridge consisted of a 150 grains (9.7 g), flat-base cupronickel-jacketed-bullet. After World War I, the U.S. military needed better long-range performance machine guns. Based on weapons performance reports from Europe, a streamlined, 173 grains (11.2 g) boattail, gilding-metal bullet was used. The .30-06 cartridge, with the 173 grains (11.2 g) bullet was called Cartridge, .30, M1 Ball. The .30-06 cartridge was far more powerful than the smaller Japanese 6.5×50mm Arisaka cartridge and comparable to the Japanese 7.7×58mm Arisaka. The new M1 ammunition proved to be significantly more accurate than the M1906 round.<22>

remington 30-06 clip

In 1938, the unstained, 150 grains (9.7 g), flat-base bullet combined with the .30-06 case became the M2 ball cartridge. The M2 Ball specifications required 2,740 feet per second (835.2 m/s) minimum velocity, measured 78 feet (24 m) from the muzzle.<23> M2 Ball was the standard-issue ammunition for military rifles and machine guns until it was replaced by the 7.62×51mm NATO round in 1954. For rifle use, M2 Ball ammunition proved to be less accurate than the earlier M1 cartridge; even with match rifles, a target group of 5 inches (130 mm) diameter at 200 yards (180 m) using the 150-grain (9.7 g) M2 bullet was considered optimal, and many rifles did not perform nearly as well.

See more: How Big Is 40 X 50 Cm In Inches ? How To Convert 40 Cm To Inches

<22> The U.S. Marine Corps retained stocks of M1 ammunition for use by snipers and trained marksmen throughout the Solomon Islands campaign in the early years of the war.<24>

The .30-06 cartridge was designed when shots of 1,000 yards (914.4m) were expected. In 1906, the original M1906 .30-06 cartridge consisted of a 150 grains (9.7g), flat-basejacketed-bullet. After World War I, the U.S. military needed better long-range performance machine guns. Based on weapons performance reports from Europe, a streamlined, 173 grains (11.2g) boattail,bullet was used. The .30-06 cartridge, with the 173 grains (11.2g) bullet was called cartridge, .30, M1 ball. The .30-06 cartridge was far more powerful than the smaller Japanesecartridge and comparable to the Japanese 7.7x58mm Aerisaka. The new M1 ammunition proved to be significantly more accurate than the M1906 round