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You are watching: Are cc and ml the same thing


In a continual context, us assume the ml and cc space equilvalent. They"re actually not. I check out this what on the net or in a book. The particular resource said that they"re various by an extremely minute quantity. This popped right into my mind today, due to the fact that a data top top water ns was reading shows the difference. It claims that density of water in ~ 3.98°C is 1.000000g/ml or 0.999972g/cc. If girlfriend don"t think me, look in Merck table of contents 12th edition, chemical # 10175, water.I understand I read it as soon as already, however I"d prefer the precisely number in the book again. Ns didn"t find anything on Google. Just about everything I found there presume ml=cc.
Maybe the editor determined to have some fun. And this belongs in HT?
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ummm... Didn"t the french define a mL = cm^3? merck can"t just redefine it. Yet one more indication that suppliers are ending up being too powerful.
Yes, this difference between the milliliter and also the cubic centimeter to be well known amongst the fine trained.An old chem. Textbook has the definition as 1 milliliter = 1.000027 cc.I looked at a few pages at connect to try to kind it out. Not much aid with the old definitions. I think, with SI/MKS and also the redefinition that the meter, etc., castle are now the same. However, that is still murky come me simply what the precise weight/density that water is under the SI.Edit: Ok, the price is in her orig post. Water weighs a small less than 1 gram/cc. The ml had actually been identified as the volume the 1 gram that water - a little amount larger than 1 cc.

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Yes, this difference between the milliliter and the cubic centimeter was well known among the well trained.An old chem. Textbook has the an interpretation as 1 milliliter = 1.000027 cc.I looked in ~ a couple of pages at attach to shot to kind it out. Not much aid with the old definitions. Ns think, with SI/MKS and also the redefinition the the meter, etc., they are currently the same. However, that is still murky to me simply what the exact weight/density the water is under the SI.Edit: Ok, the price is in your orig post. Water weighs a small less than 1 gram/cc. The ml had been defined as the volume of 1 gram the water - a tiny amount bigger than 1 cc. >>Thanks highwire. Headsup from someone was specifically what ns needed. Now deserve to somebody come up with a couple of more credible sites? Didn"t discover anything on national Institutes of requirements and technology homepage.